DOUALA: Statutory meeting on fisheries, aquaculture and pastoralism

Friday, 2018, October 5

The economic capital of Cameroon, Douala was the high point of a statutory meeting of fisheries, aquaculture and pastoralism experts from member countries of the Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC), from 25 to 28 September 2018.
Experts from Cameroon, Niger, Nigeria, Central African Republic, Chad and the Niger Basin Authority (NBA) reviewed the current state of policy, legislative and regulatory framework in fisheries, aquaculture and pastoralism in the Lake Chad region. They reviewed the policy, legislative and regulatory frameworks within their respective countries and beyond their territories, especially the areas covered by the basin in each country.
They also identified strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in order to suggest a harmonization framework towards updating the Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis (TDA), Strategic Action Programme (SAP) and Vision 2025 of LCBC, in accordance with the provisions of the LCBC Water Charter.
Indeed, be it Vision 2025 or SAP, these two documents were drawn up on the basis of Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis. The TDA lists environmental problems, LCBC’s policy, through the Water Charter. It aims at ensuring the economic security of freshwater ecosystem resources, the preservation of biodiversity and the sustainability of aquatic resources and their equitable use in order to meet the needs of the population and reduce poverty.
After four days of discussions and presentations by experts, small workshops and constructive discussions, the meeting drew up a list of constructive recommendations.
LCBC:

  • harmonizing the legislative and regulatory framework in the Lake Chad Basin;
  • strengthening monitoring and control of fishing and aquaculture activities in the basin;
  • strengthening collaboration between research institutions in the field of fisheries and aquaculture and LCBC;
  • setting up a Committee to monitor the implementation of recommendations comprising fisheries and aquaculture experts from LCBC and the Member States;
  • considering the safety of fishermen in the exercise of their activities;
  • recruit a consultant to harmonise the regulatory and legislative frameworks for fisheries and aquaculture.

Member States:

  • structuring of fisheries organisations per sector (fishermen, processors, etc.);
  • strict application of instruments and laws governing fishing and aquaculture in the Lake Chad Basin;
  • strengthening monitoring and control of fishing and aquaculture activities in the basin;
  • availability to LCBC of laws and regulations relating to fishing and aquaculture;
  • encouraging States to revise national fisheries and aquaculture regulations;
  • considering the safety of fishermen in the exercise of their activities;
  • adopting a participatory approach which involves various partners concerned (traditional and customary authorities, local institutions, the State, etc.) in the sustainable shared management of the basin’s natural resources;
  • providing information and awareness-raising for transhumant livestock farmers and livestock agents on the regulations in force in the countries of departure and reception at community level;
  • securing pastoral areas and operationalizing their management structures (delimitation and marking of animal corridors, water points, enclaves, livestock theft, terrorism, etc.);
  • supporting and harmonising research in the field of cross-border transhumance through research institutions;
  • establishing or relaunching and expanding the fields of action of joint commissions, etc.